Science Outreach

When I was 13 I started volunteering at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science. I have been doing science outreach ever since. I have done stage shows, classes, and many public observatory nights. I find that working with the public reminds me what I find so exciting about planetary science. Answering questions forces me to think about problems in new ways and challenge things I take for granted. If you would like me to give a talk or have another opportunity you can contact me here

Exploration at the edge of the solar system
UC Santa Cruz 3-minute thesis, Feb. 2020.

Can you terraform Mars with nukes?
South Bay astronomy on tap, Jan. 2020.

Oceans on icy worlds
Santa Cruz astronomy on tap, Jul. 2018.

The history of the martian south polar cap
SETI Talks, Oct. 2016.

Lowell Observatory
Volunteer Docent/Telescope operator, 2012-2014

Chamberlin Observatory
Volunteer Docent/Telescope operator, 2009-2010

Denver Museum of Nature and Science
Floor volunteer, 2005-2010



Teaching Experience and Pedagogy

During my high school years I got the opportunity to begin teaching 6th grade students through my local public school district. I then began writing curriculum and training other high-school students how to teach. Afterward I spent a year teaching science to 6th-8th grade students in inner-city Chicago. That school was 99% black students and 1% Hispanic, opening my eyes to the challenges faced by those students. As an undergraduate I tutored both privately and in the college tutoring center. I was a TA for introductory astronomy lab courses. As a graduate student, in addition to TAing, I have been the full instructor for a undergraduate course on scientific computing.

I am constantly seeking out opportunities to teach people of all ages both because I enjoy it, and to improve my craft. When I teach I apply the lessons I have learned doing outreach; know where your audience is at, know where you want to take them, and have a hook to keep them engaged along the way. When I taught scientific computing, I used quick review questions at the start of each class to keep a pulse on my students understanding. I gave students lecture notes ahead of time so they could review them before class or follow along. I asked my students what kinds of examples they were interested in to make sure the content stayed relevant to them. The lecture notes I created for that class are available here

Introduction to scientific computing (UC Santa Cruz ASTR/EART 119)
Full instructor, Summer 2017 (Full lecture notes)
Teaching Assistant, Fall 2015

Introductory astronomy lab (NAU AST 180L)
Teaching Assistant, Fall 2012-Spring 2014

City Year Chicago (Americorps)
Corps member, 2010-2011

Jefferson County Outdoor Education Labratory School,
High school intern, 2007-2008
Telescope operator, 2008-2009
College intern, 2009-2010